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Arduino uploaded code not working


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#21 kushshah0423

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 12:11 AM

The male headers are secure. Whenever I connect the 2 wires to the battery, the right motor starts spinning slowly. Then, whenever I move the headers a little like a tilt or anything, the following outcomes happen:

Both motors stop

Right motor stops moving and left starts

Right motor moves opposite direction while left moves backwards slowly


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#22 Nathan House

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Posted 08 February 2015 - 03:05 AM

Is there any way I can send you a video of what's going on like email or something?

 
Sure, that would be very helpful. You can put it on YouTube and put a link to it in this thread, or email me me the link at customerservice@foxytronics.com.

 

The male headers are secure. Whenever I connect the 2 wires to the battery, the right motor starts spinning slowly. Then, whenever I move the headers a little like a tilt or anything, the following outcomes happen:
Both motors stop
Right motor stops moving and left starts
Right motor moves opposite direction while left moves backwards slowly

 

This definitely is sounding like a wiring or breadboard problem. Try replacing all of the jumper wires and moving the headers for the servo cables to a different spot on the breadboard. Please try this out before shooting the video.


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#23 Nathan House

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Posted 17 February 2015 - 06:08 PM

The server that hosts this website had an issue and I had to restore from a backup, which resulted in your latest post being deleted. Sorry about that. You said:

 

 

I replaced all the wires and carefully planted them on the breadboard. Don't see a difference so here's the video:

 

Thanks for making the video showing the behavior of your robot. 

 

I think you're going to need a multimeter to debug the problem. If you don't have one, you should be able to pick one up pretty inexpensively at a local store (if you're in the U.S., harbor freight sells them, as do most automotive stores).

 

Here are a few things to check:

  • voltage across the entire battery pack (to verify the batteries are good)
  • voltage at the servo connectors
  • use the ohmmeter/continuity setting to check to see if any of the jumper wires are bad (since moving the wires around changes what's happening, I think this may be the issue)

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#24 kushshah0423

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Posted 21 February 2015 - 04:34 AM

I will buy the multimeter tomorrow and check, but for now I've encountered another problem. As if it couldn't get any worse  :mellow: . When I connected the batteries with the wire this evening, the arduino would not work. No lights or anything. I was really worried that I might have just fried it. Fortunately I had a fake (non-official) board from Amazon to test that with. The fake one did not work either. I plugged the robot in with the computer and nothing happened. I touched the capacitors and they were warm so I took the arduino out of everything. As I was doing this. I removed the 5v pin from the board and everything started up like any usual board. I was surprised so I put the 5v back in for curiosity. The board stopped working.  I connected only the original board to the computer and it worked fine. So I think there is a problem with something involving the breadboard or wiring.


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#25 Nathan House

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Posted 21 February 2015 - 04:39 AM

The board getting hot and LEDs turning off when you plugged that 5V wire in is an indication that you somehow created a short circuit.

 

A multimeter will be one of the best investments you ever make. It doesn't have to be super expensive or fancy, just measure resistance and voltage. After wiring a project, you should get into the habit of checking for short circuits before powering it on (by measuring the resistance from the power pin/rail to GND).

 

I've done electronics and robotics projects for probably close to a decade now and still find myself regularly creating short circuits on accident. It's really easy to do..


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#26 kushshah0423

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 05:12 AM

Does this mean I should buy another Arduino? I used the cheaper Arduino and it also had the same effect. Also, the sticky double sided tape on my breadboard came off so I used my tape to re seal the metal portions but if I was to insert a wire, it doesn't feel securely placed, it feels really loose for some reason. Should I buy another breadboard and jumper wires also?


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#27 Nathan House

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 12:52 PM

Arduino's are fairly short-circuit resistant. As long as it wasn't left on for a long time when it was hot, it's probably fine.

 

Did you end up buying a multimeter? Once you have one, you can check to make sure there's no short circuit and also that the Arduino is even getting any power.


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